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March 2021
Reading time 5 minutes

To celebrate World Book Day, the Living North team are sharing some of their favourite reads with you

Thursday, 4th March is World Book Day – a perfect day to add something new to your reading list. From thrillers and mysteries to drama and romance, we’ve got plenty of inspiration for you.
How to Run a Marathon, by Vassos Alexander

How to Run a Marathon, by Vassos Alexander

In 2020 I set myself the goal of running a half marathon (along with half the country who began dabbling in the sport). Two half marathons and over 400 miles later, cue 2021 – I’d decided this one was going to be the year of the marathon. To label this book as a how to guide would be to do it a disservice. Vassos (radio presenter-cum- race runner) reveals his arsenal of tips and tricks for marathon running – and shorter distance running too – in a thoughtful, light hearted and inclusive way, that will resonate with runners of all abilities. He shares his own personal story, along with stories from individuals running the world’s most notable races, in such a way you’ll find it hard not to tie up your shoe laces and head for the start line.
Lucy Murray, Food Editor

Madam by Phoebe Wynne

Madam by Phoebe Wynne

 Set in the confines of the eery Caldonbrae Hall boarding school for girls, Madam is a cleverly written, dark tale revolving around powerful female ambition. It’s a book that’s truly hard to put down, as you’re constantly trying to figure out what’s been
going on behind those closed doors above the Scottish cliffs for 150 years. Rose Christie, a 26-year-old Classics teacher and new head of department, slowly uncovers the darkness that lingers here. She also comes to love some of the fierce young women in the school as she tries to find a way to escape the fate which lies in store for them.
Faye Dixon, Editorial Writer

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman

A peaceful retirement village may not seem to be the best setting for a murder mystery novel, but this pleasingly- contrary tale from TV’s Richard Osman, featuring four old-aged- investigators, is fabulous. What starts out as a straightforward whodunnit soon drags you into its complex world, which is populated by an extensive cast of entertaining characters, and peppered with the sort of sharp one- liners you might expect from Osman. A touch of the macabre at the heart of many characters stops the whole thing becoming overly saccharine – oh, and there are the bodies too...
Kate Foley, Assistant Editor

The Magpie Society: One for Sorrow by Amy McCulloch and Zoe Sugg

The Magpie Society: One for Sorrow by Amy McCulloch and Zoe Sugg

Nail-biting is the only way I can describe this book – a far-cry from Zoe’s previous work in her Girl Online series. A student is found dead on a beach, there’s a web of unanswered questions and the killer could strike again. New student Audrey notices secrets her school seems to hide, as well as a weird obsession with magpies. For her roommate Ivy, the death of her friend is heartbreaking and having a new girl asking questions isn’t helping, but they’re forced to work together when a mysterious podcast airs, with one sinister headline: I Know Who Killed Lola and One of You Is Next. Told from their two viewpoints, this one’s hard to put down.
Faye Dixon, Editorial Writer

The Guest List by Lucy Foley

The Guest List by Lucy Foley

If you’ve read The Hunting Party, you might understand why this book, by the same author, is just as thrilling – and also understand why it was long-listed for the CWA Gold Dagger 2020. On an island off the Irish coast, guests gather for the wedding of the year: the marriage of Jules Keegan and Will Slater. But, it’s not long before one of the guests is found dead and, as a storm heads for the island, everyone is trapped. They all have a motive, so it’s a classic whodunnit but with all the modern twists you expect from this author. This was certainly a read that was hard to put down.
Faye Dixon, Editorial Writer

The Sentinel by Lee and Andrew Child

The Sentinel by Lee and Andrew Child

Something of a new dawn for Jack Reacher, this book has been co-written by Lee Child and his younger brother Andrew – but the avenger we know and love is just the same. This thriller had me on the edge of my seat from the beginning – as Jack gets off a bus just outside Nashville, Tennessee and discovers that the town has been shut down by a cyber attack. He might just have to stick around and find out what on earth’s gone wrong...
Kate Foley, Assistant Editor

Dead Men's Trousers by Irvine Welsh

Dead Men's Trousers by Irvine Welsh

As the final chapter in the trilogy, Dead Men’s Trousers follows Danny Boyle’s Trainspotting 2, tailing the anti-hero crew as their lives intersect again for a third and final time. Those who’ve read an Irvine Welsh novel in the past will know his colloquial Scottish style which makes for truly unique reading, and defines Welsh as a one-of-a-kind author. This book is another powerhouse from Welsh, and not one for the faint of heart.
James Hastie, Advertising Executive

The Flip Side by James Bailey

The Flip Side by James Bailey

Looking for a light-hearted read in these challenging times, I stumbled across this hilarious and romantic debut novel, and it had me giggling from the very first page. It’s New Year’s Eve and Josh has a high-flying proposal planned, but it goes far from perfectly and after the break up, and constant teasing from his friends, he decides to leave the rest of his decisions up to chance – with the flip of a coin. While some things work out, other’s don’t, and his misfortunes are so funny, you always want to read on. I can’t wait for James to release more laugh-out-loud tales.
Faye Dixon, Editorial Writer

Stranger Things: Darkness on the Edge of Town by Adam Christopher

Stranger Things: Darkness on the Edge of Town by Adam Christopher

Adapted directly from the beloved Netflix series, this book tells the story of Agent Hopper’s career as a detective in 1970s New York Police Department – a subject he is quick to dismiss in the series. The book is reminiscent of Sol Yurick’s The Warriors, exaggerating the documented mayhem of New York with a cartoonish street gang known as The Vipers and a mysterious killer on the loose. This is a brilliant read, adding more depth to fan-favourite James Hopper.
James Hastie, Advertising Executive

Back to School by Jack Sheffield

Back to School by Jack Sheffield

Set in the beautiful Yorkshire Dales in the late 60s, this book makes for a perfect escape to a simpler time. Jack Sheffield is a young teacher finding his feet at a primary school that’s far from perfect, and he’s truing to improve it – but that task isn’t an easy one. From drama to humour this story has it all. You’re invested in Jack’s relationship woes and the children’s tales instantly as you take a nostalgic trip back to school. As number 13 in the series, I look forward to picking up the other copies for another escape soon.
Faye Dixon, Editorial Writer

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