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Meet the Maker: STOSH Workshop
Interiors
September 2021
Reading time 3 Minutes

Specialising in handcrafted wooden serveware and home accessories, STOSH Workshop create unique, one-of-a-kind wooden products using locally-sourced oak

We chatted with founder Adam Thornton about the inspiration behind his work, and what we can expect from STOSH Workshop when they join us at Living North’s Christmas Fair

Tell us about your background.

Woodworking has been a long-term hobby of mine, and two years ago I had the opportunity to turn that hobby into a business. We renovated an old semi-derelict outbuilding, turning it into our STOSH Workshop. Through lots of learning, practice, product development and refinement we are now at a point where we’re ready to present our products at Living North’s Christmas Fair.

Tell us about STOSH Workshop, what is it that you do?

We take locally-sourced oak trees, cutting and drying them, then shape, sand and finish them to create a completely unique selection of boards, serving platters, vases and other home decorations. We source all our timber from within five miles of our workshop, and it’s from a carefully managed woodland. If we hadn’t repurposed the tree trunks we use, most of them would have just been used for firewood. 

How did STOSH Workshop come about?

It started after we received some lovely feedback from friends and family about the gifts we made for them. We then decided to take the idea and turn a hobby into a business. After two years of development we have a selection of high quality, handmade and truly unique oak homeware products.

What inspires your designs?

The designs are all about the individual pieces of oak. This design philosophy allows us to waste as little as possible, for example if a particular trunk is too small to make boards, we can make baguette boards or epoxy stream boards. If a trunk is too small for that we can make vases or tea light holders. The trimmings and chips left over are used to heat the building, minimising waste and making the most out of this important natural resource.


STOSH
STOSH
STOSH

Tell us about your background.

Woodworking has been a long-term hobby of mine, and two years ago I had the opportunity to turn that hobby into a business. We renovated an old semi-derelict outbuilding, turning it into our STOSH Workshop. Through lots of learning, practice, product development and refinement we are now at a point where we’re ready to present our products at Living North’s Christmas Fair.

Tell us about STOSH Workshop, what is it that you do?

We take locally-sourced oak trees, cutting and drying them, then shape, sand and finish them to create a completely unique selection of boards, serving platters, vases and other home decorations. We source all our timber from within five miles of our workshop, and it’s from a carefully managed woodland. If we hadn’t repurposed the tree trunks we use, most of them would have just been used for firewood. 

How did STOSH Workshop come about?

It started after we received some lovely feedback from friends and family about the gifts we made for them. We then decided to take the idea and turn a hobby into a business. After two years of development we have a selection of high quality, handmade and truly unique oak homeware products.

What inspires your designs?

The designs are all about the individual pieces of oak. This design philosophy allows us to waste as little as possible, for example if a particular trunk is too small to make boards, we can make baguette boards or epoxy stream boards. If a trunk is too small for that we can make vases or tea light holders. The trimmings and chips left over are used to heat the building, minimising waste and making the most out of this important natural resource.

Talk us through the creative process.

After the timber is cut and dried, we measure up to see which product the individual piece is suitable for. Once that is decided, we shape the oak. We then cut any inserts needed if the piece is going to have glasses, dishes or flowers in it. The piece is then sanded to a fine finish and treated with a blend of food-safe beeswax and mineral oil.

Do you have a favourite design?

I love every piece we make – it wouldn’t be allowed to leave the workshop if I didn’t! However I do have a particular soft spot for the thick chunky oak boards. There is something about the size and weight of a thick oak board that appeals to me, especially the ones with a really interesting live edge.

What does a typical working day look like for you?

One of the great things about what we do is there isn’t a typical day. The variety in the processes for making our products and the individual nature of each tree trunk means that there’s no chance of boredom – even after a full day of sanding.

What’s the best thing about what you do?

There are lots of things – the moment the beeswax or mineral oil is applied to the oak and when the grain and colour of the oak pops and comes to life. I also love watching the reaction of customers as they see our products for the first time and then choose their favourite – there are so many great aspects.

Are you creating anything new for Living North’s Christmas Fair?

Every piece is unique so it’s all new, however we have a new design for the Christmas Fair – a selection of champagne tasting flights using Riedel stemless champagne flutes, which are gorgeous.

stoshworkshop.co.uk 


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